Courses: Biblical and Theological Studies

 

General Studies

  • GEN 301

English Grammar Tutorial (non-credit) The purpose of this course is to give students who have failed the standardised STC English competency exam, or who otherwise need extra practice in the area of English Grammar, an opportunity to work on areas of deficiency in order to successfully take GEN 302 at the commencement of BTh studies.
 

  • GEN 302

English Grammar and Composition (3hrs) The purpose of this course is to strengthen writing skills by reviewing elements of English grammar, developing critical thinking skills, and practicing effective writing through brief compositions. Prerequisite: Must have achieved a ‘pass’ in GEN 301 or its equivalency.

  • GEN 303

English Grammar and Composition Tutorial (non-credit) The purpose of this course is to give students, who have failed to achieve a passing grade in GEN 302, individual learning programmes suited to their particular needs to enable them to attain greater proficiency in English grammar and composition.

  • GEN 304

Computing Studies 1 (non-credit) This computing course is aimed at equipping students with knowledge and skills that will help them to perform various tasks related to operating systems, keyboarding, word processing, networking, Internet, e-mails and file-sharing. The course is practically oriented, emphasizing skill development for academic-related assignments.

  • GEN 305

Academic Writing and Research (3 hrs) The purpose of this course is to strengthen the students’ skills in basic collegiate thinking and writing. Further, it is to equip them with an understanding of the nature of research as a disciplined endeavour, equipping them with the basic research skills and methods to conduct their own research. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in GEN 302 English Grammar and Composition.

 

  • GEN 306

Community Development and HIV/AIDs (3hrs) This course is designed to help students develop, in theirchurches, an awareness of community needs and to realise their potential in addressing those needs.  It purposes to equip them with truth, ideas and facts for their own application and to combat myths about community problems especially to overcome the fear and stigma of HIV/AIDS.  It will move them toward a vision of holistic development and growth for the church and in the community.

  • GEN 307

 

Introduction to Communication (3hrs) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the field of communication, inclusive of skills related to a wide variety of contexts that hold specific relevance to church related ministries.

 

  • GEN 308

Computing Studies II This course provides students will knowledge and skills related to presentation, desktoppublishing, spreadsheets and database management systems. Pre-requisites:  The student must have achieved a ‘pass’ on GEN 304 Computing I.

  • GEN 309

Academic Writing Tutorial (non-credit) The purpose of this course is to give students, who have failed to achieve a passing grade in GEN 305, individual learning programmes suited to their particular needs to enable them to attain greater proficiency in written English.

  • GEN 311

Introduction to Music Theory and Practice (3hrs) The purpose of this course is to develop basic knowledge and skills related to the field of music theory, history, and practice.

  • GEN 312

Swahili (3hrs) This course is designed to help the student develop better communication skills in Kiswahili through a variety of speaking and writing experiences.

  • GEN 401

Introduction to Cultural Interpretation (3hrs) The purpose of this course is to provide students the  basic framework and tools for interpreting social and cultural contexts. They will be introduced to the concept and dynamics of worldview in modern Africa with the aim of bringing Christian transformation to the student and their societies.

  • GEN 402

Introduction to Psychology (2hrs) This course is designed to introduce students to the field of psychology so that they can gain a better understanding of human behaviour, and then apply that understanding in a relevant ministry setting.

  • GEN 403

Major Religions and Cults in Africa (3hrs) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the history, beliefs and practices of the major religions in Africa; including a comparison of Christianity with Islam, Africa Traditional Religions, Hinduism, and Buddhism. The course includes a survey of other religious movements with special attention to those most prevalent within contemporary African contexts, along with an appropriate Christian response, in word and action, to the claims of the various groups studied.

Prerequisites: Pass grade in GEN 401 Introduction to Cultural Interpretation.

  • GEN 404

Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics (3hrs) The purpose of this course is to enable the student to understand various philosophical and ethical views dominant in the world today, to engage intellectually in a variety of philosophical and ethical issues, and to integrate faith and reason in living a life of discipleship to Jesus Christ.

  • GEN 411

Topics in Community Development (2-3hrs)

  • GEN 412

Topics in the Social Sciences (2-3hrs)

  • GEN 413

Topics in History (2-3hrs)

  • GEN 414

Topics in Philosophy (2-3hrs)

  • GEN 415

Topics in Psychology (2-3hrs) These courses are designed to give students an opportunity to study under visiting lecturers with special competence in relevant areas related to the above disciplines. Alternatively, students may pursue a directed reading course in an area of special interest for which the student has demonstrated appropriate competencies.

Course Outlines will be developed for the abovementioned courses by the visiting lecturers and approved by the Deputy Principal for Academic Affairs. The credit hours are determined by the course outlines respective to individual teacher preferences and in collaboration with the Academic office.

 

Biblical Studies

  • BIB 301
    Old Testament Survey (3hrs)
    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the geography, history, and content of the books of the Old Testament.
    BIB 302
    New Testament Survey (3hrs)
    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the geography, history, and content of the books of the New Testament.
  • BIB 303
    Biblical Hermeneutics (3hrs)
    This course is designed to equip the student for study of the English Bible using a variety of Bible study methods in addition to the inductive Bible study method.  This enables the student to develop interpretative skills that are necessary for discovering the meaning of a biblical passage and transmitting that meaning and its application to others.  Prerequisites: Pass grades in BIB 301 Old Testament Survey, BIB 302 New Testament Survey
  • BIB 401 
    Greek I (3hrs)
    The course is designed to introduce the student to the Greek alphabet, language, elements of grammar, and Greek study tools so as to lay a foundation for the study of the New Testament Greek.
  • Biblical Studies: New Testament

  • BIB 102
    The Gospels (3 Credits)
    The course is designed to enhance understanding and appreciation of the life and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ as presented in the Gospels in order to love, worship, serve, glorify and proclaim Christ more effectively. It includes: a survey of the historical and religious developments of the intertestamental period; the distinctive characteristics of each Gospel; tracing the life of Christ through a harmony of the Gospels; topical studies on the miracles and parables of Christ and prominent teachings of Jesus.
  • BIB 103
    Acts and Pauline Epistles (3 Credits)
    A survey of the books of the New Testament from Acts to Philemon, focusing on the historical background of each letter and the general content of each. The books are studied chronologically using the book of Acts as the framework.
    Prerequisite: Passing grade in BIB 102
  • BIB 202
    General Epistles and Revelation (3 Credits)
    A survey of the books of the New Testament from Hebrews to Revelation, their general content and background. Particular attention will be given to Hebrews as well as the message of Revelation and it’s meaning for today.
    Prerequisite: Passing grade in BIB 103
  • BIB 303
    Romans (3 Credits)
    An exegetical study of Romans 1-11, focusing on Paul’s teaching on sin, justification, sanctification, and election. The practical application of the principles learned in BIB 104 and BIB 204 is emphasized.
    Prerequisite: Passing grade in BIB 204 and MIN 301.
  • BIB 413
    Missionary Methods of Paul (3 Credits)
    A study of the Book of Acts and the writings of the Apostle Paul to ascertain Paul’s missionary credentials, methods and strategy of planting the church among peoples of another culture, including: selection of target groups; presentation of the gospel; conversion and training of converts; the growth and care of the churches.
  • Biblical Studies: Languages

  • BIB 203
  • Greek I (3 Credits) An introduction to New Testament Greek, the Greek alphabet and elements of basic Greek grammar. It includes basic vocabulary; the study of verbs in the present indicative active and imperfect indicative active; the study of noun cases, adjectives and pronouns: and the translation of simple sentences from Greek to English
  • BIB 221
    Greek II (3 Credits)
    An intermediate course in New Testament Greek covering: extended vocabulary; the passive and middle voices of verbs; the aorist and future tenses of verbs; imperatives and infinitives; pronouns and prepositions; and the translation of more complex sentences from Greek to English.
    Prerequisite: Grade of B- or better in BIB 203
  • BIB 222
    Special Greek (3 Credits)
    An alternative to BIB 221, this course is designed to equip the student to obtain the meaning of the Greek New Testament text without extensive knowledge of Greek grammar and vocabulary. It provides a survey of Greek grammar including the mastery of essential parts of speech. Using an analytical Greek lexicon, an interlinear Greek-English New Testament and other Greek language tools are used for word studies in the Greek New Testament and to engage in elementary exegesis.
  • BIB 321
    Greek III (3 Credits)
    A more advanced course in New Testament Greek as preparation for the translation and exegesis of the Greek New Testament. It includes further vocabulary extension; further study of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives; the perfect and pluperfect verb tenses, aorist passive and future passive verb forms, participles, the subjunctive mood; the translation of more complex sentences from Greek to English, including verses from the Greek New Testament.
    Prerequisite:
    Grade of C or better in BIB 221.
  • BIB 322
    Seminar on Johannine Epistles (3 Credits)
    An alternative to BIB 321, this course is designed to help the student interpret the Johannine Epistles in their historical setting and theological perspectives using the Greek tools learned in BIB 222 with application made to the Christian life today. It includes the exposition of selected portions of the text; the exposition of themes or topic occurring in the text; study related to devotional, teaching and homiletical materials.
    Prerequisite:
    Passing grade in BIB 104, BIB 204 and BIB 222. Students with a passing grade in BIB 221 who have not qualified for BIB 321 may also take this course.
  • BIB 323
    Greek Exegesis of 1 John (3 Credits)
    The course is designed to enable the student to develop the skills of New Testament Greek translation and exegesis through the study of 1 John in the original language. It includes translating the Epistle of 1 John from Greek to English; a comprehensive study of Greek constructions in the Epistle; a survey of exegetical material for each section of the Epistle.
    Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIB 321.
  • BIB 324
    Seminar on Luke (3 Credits)
    This course is designed as an alternative to BIB 323 to help students interpret portions of the Gospel of Luke building on the knowledge of New Testament Greek developed in prior courses and the principles learned in BIB 104 and BIB 204. It includes the use of hermeneutical and Greek tools for an exegetical study of the Gospel in its historical setting and with its theological teaching; applying an inductive methods of Bible study to both the exposition of selected portions of the text and themes or topics in the text; study related to devotional, teaching and homiletic materials relevant to the text.
    Prerequisite:
    Passing grade in BIB 222 or BIB 321.
  • BIB 421
    Greek Exegesis of Luke (3 Credits)
    An extension of New Testament Greek translation and exegetical skills through the study of portions of the Gospel of Luke in the original language. It includes the translation of portions of Luke’s Gospel from Greek to English with careful attention given to verb constructions and the interpretation of significant elements of Greek grammar and study of exegetical material for each portion studied in Luke’s Gospel.
    Prerequisite: Passing grade in BIB 323.
  • BIB 422
    Seminar on the Prison Epistles (3 Credits)
    An exegetical study of Paul’s prison epistles using the principles of BIB 104 and BIB 204 and the knowledge of Greek gained from prior courses. The study covers: the exposition of selected portions of the text; the exposition of themes or topics according to the text; study of devotional, teaching and homiletical materials relevant to the text
    Prerequisite:
    Passing grade in BIB 324.
  • BIB 431
    Hebrew I (3 Credits)
    An introduction to biblical Hebrew as a tool for better understanding of the Old Testament Scriptures. Components of the Hebrew language covered include: the Hebrew alphabet; the Hebrew system of points and accents; nouns, pronouns and adjectives; pronominal suffixes on prepositions, particles and nouns; the perfect forms of verbs; the Qal imperfect form of verbs; the jussive and cohortative. An inductive method is employed that emphasises learning the Hebrew language through frequent use rather than through abstract memorization.
  • BIB 432
    Hebrew II (3 Credits)
    Together with Hebrew I provides a complete introductory study of biblical Hebrew as a tool for better understanding of the Old Testament Scriptures. This course covers the Hebrew imperfect; pronominal suffixes with the perfect and imperfect; the infinitive construct and absolute; participles; coordinate relationships of verbs; weak verbs. As with Hebrew I an inductive method is used giving students extended opportunity for using Hebrew in understanding the Old Testament.
  • Biblical Studies: General

  • BIB 104
    Inductive Bible Study (3 Credits)
    This course is designed to equip the student for study of the English Bible for using the inductive Bible study method in the study of I Corinthians, without the aid of reference books. The ground covered includes: determining and summarising the main point of a passage; careful observation of a passage to identify and learn its key features; charting a book according to the grammatical parts of speech; interpreting the passage by considering the meaning and relationships of key words, phrases and statements; applying the passage to life by asking what we are to believe, do or learn from this passage for our lives today.
  • BIB 204
    Hermeneutics (3 Credits)
    Developing advanced interpretative skills to discover the meaning of a statement of Scripture for the author and for the first hearers or readers and to transmit that meaning and application to modern readers. It includes: a brief survey of the history of biblical interpretation; biblical presuppositions in the study of Scripture; principles of sound biblical exegesis; priority of the original languages; accommodation of revelation; progressive revelation; historical, cultural and textual context; differentiating interpretation from application; the unity of the sense of Scripture; interpreting according to the literary mould; the interpretation of types, prophecy and parables.
    Prerequisite:
    Passing grade in BIB 104.
  • BIB 402
    Biblical Criticism (3 Credits)
    Study of the formation of the biblical canon, the transmission of the text of Scripture, form and redaction criticism and the authorship, unity and dating of select books of the Bible. It includes: an examination of history and principles of the formation of the canon of Scripture; the origin and nature of the non-canonical literature; the materials, methods and transmission of the text of Scripture; an introduction to form and redaction criticism.
  • BIB 411
    Bible Study Methods (3 Credits)
    This course is designed to enable students to use a variety of Bible study methods for leading others in Bible study without reference to Greek Bible study tools. It involves a study of various methods of Bible study, building on the inductive methods studied in BIB 104, including synthetic, topical, biographical, analytical, historical and geographical methods, with practice in the use of these methods for both private and group study.
    Prerequisites:
    Passing grade in BIB 104 and BIB 204.
  • Theological Studies: Systematic Theology

  • THE 201
    Theology I:
    Revelation, God, Creation and Angels (3 Credits)
    A course designed to help students build a Christian world view appropriate to the contemporary African context. It includes: the definition of theology and the proper approach to theology; the doctrine of the Word, including general and special revelation, inspiration, authority and illumination; the doctrine of God; the creation of the material world; the creation, nature, position and power of angels, the fall of Satan, demon opsion and possession; the relation of the various doctrines studied to African traditional belief and contemporary African theology.
  • THE 202
    Theology II:
    Humanity, Sin and Christ (3 Credits)
    Continuing the focus on building a Christian worldview appropriate to the contemporary African context, this course covers: the creation of humanity in the image of God, the cultural mandate and the state of innocence; the fall, the nature of sin and its transmission to Adam’s posterity; the doctrine of the person and work of Christ as the Restorer of fallen humanity; the virgin birth, the incarnation, and the hypostatic union of Christ, his death and exaltation; theories of the atonement; the ideas of African Traditional Religion and contemporary African theology on humanity, sin and Christ are compared to biblical teaching.
    Prerequisite:
    Passing grade in THE 201.
  • THE 301
    Theology III:
    Salvation and the Holy Spirit (3 Credits)
    A study of salvation and the Holy Spirit to equip students for a response in worship for what God has done for us, effectively teach others these truths and be able to refute error concerning these teachings. It includes grace and salvation; election, union with Christ, effectual calling; regeneration, conversion, faith and justification, perseverance and glorification; Calvinist/Arminian perspectives on the topics covered.
    Prerequisite:
    Passing grade in THE 202.
  • THE 302
    Theology IV:
    Church and the Last Days (3 Credits)
    A study of the church and future events to equip students for ministry in the church with a clear purpose in mind and answer clearly the many questions people have about future events. It includes: The church: origin, nature, policy, ordinances, ministry and mission; personal eschatology: death, immortality, the intermediate state; resurrection and judgment; the events surrounding the second coming of Christ, such as the tribulation, rapture, millennium; the final state.
    Prerequisite: P
    assing grade in THE 301.
  • Theological Studies: Theology in the African Context

  • THE 401
    African Christian Theology (3 Credits)
    This course is designed to enable the student to address the issues of contextualizing theology for Africa. It includes: foundation and history of African Christian theology; its relationship to biblical theology and liberation theology; key thoughts of some leading African theologians; the task of African Christian theology; Christ and salvation in African Christian theology today; relating divine truth to African political, social and cultural situations; the question of methodology in the construction of Christian theology in context. Opportunity is provided for student development of contextual theology.
  • THE 443
    African Independent Churches (3 Credits)
    A study of the reasons for the rapid growth of independent churches and their significant place in African Christianity. Representative independent churches in Africa are examined. The course emphasises individual field research, learning lessons of cultural adaptation by the African independent churches, and discerning the need for being thoroughly rooted in Scripture; evaluating their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Theological Studies: Historical Theology and Church History

  • THE 402
    World Church History (3 Credits)
    A survey of the historical development of the Christian church from the apostles to modern times in the areas of doctrine, worship, Christian unity and mission expansion. Attention is particularly given to: the early fathers and ecumenical councils; the high middle ages (especially the movements of papal supremacy, scholasticism and monasticism); the forerunners of the Reformation in the 14th and 15th centuries; the Reformation in the 16th century; the renewal movements of Puritanism and Pietism in the 17th Century; the rise of rational religion; the evangelical awakenings and mission expansion in the 18th and 19th centuries with 20th century developments.
  • THE 403
    African Church History (3 Credits)
    A survey of the historical development of the Christian church on the continent of Africa that includes: a discussion of African church historiography and the various approaches to the study of African church history; the use of the Kingdom of God as an interpretive framework; the early Christian communities of North Africa, Egypt, Nubia and Ethiopia; the rise of Islam, medieval African kingdoms, and Catholic Missions in the 15th to 17th centuries; the anti-slavery campaign and the rise and impact of Protestant missions from the 18th century to the present.
  • THE 441
    Historical Theology (3 Credits)
    The development of Christian doctrine traced from the beginning of the Christian movement to the present as an aid in the development of a personal theological understanding as an African Christian. It includes: defining the nature and task of historical theology; doctrinal developments of the Christian church in early, medieval, reformation and modern periods of the church, with special emphasis on the contribution of Augustine, the Reformers and the Puritans; a focus on key primary sources such as creeds and monographs which have helped shape the faith of orthodox Protestantism.
  • Theological Studies: Apologetics and Applied Theology

  • THE 404
    Apologetics I (3 Credits)
    An introduction to apologetics designed to enable the student to understand and respond effectively to the challenges presented by modern thinkers and writers with special attention to modern secularism. It includes: a brief survey of various approaches to apologetics; major beliefs of the modern world (rationalism, eroticism, selfism, pluralism, evolution and scientism, atheism, agnosticism, hedonism, cultural authenticity, etc.); the Christian faith as a basis for rational thinking and living in the modern world.
  • THE 405
    Apologetics II (3 Credits)
    A study of major religions and cults in Africa to equip students to meet the challenge of these groups. The term “cult” in this course is used to describe religious sects that claim to be Christian but advocate heterodox teaching in relation to the person, authority or work of Jesus Christ. The course includes: the teachings of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons, and other cults present in Africa; Islam and Hinduism with particular attention to a comparison with Christian teaching and practice; a survey of the movement commonly known as the New Age with an evaluation of its compatibility with Christian faith.
  • THE 442
    Theology of Spiritual Formation (3 Credits)
    An introduction to theory behind cultivating spiritual maturity and vitality in the lives of others. It includes: a short history of spirituality; the reading and analysis of select biblical, classic and contemporary texts on spirituality and spiritual formation; the construction of a unified theory of how spirituality may be cultivated in the lives of others.

Admission Procedures

Persons wishing to apply for admission to study in the Bachelor of Theology degree programme are expected to provide the University Admissions Officer with evidence that he or she meets the academic qualifications for admission, together with the specified application fee... See More

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